All things human

Archive for the ‘Living in the Present’ Category

A Pearl — Source of Inspiration

A pearl needs an irritant to make it grow or a life filled with patience and love

via A Pearl — Source of Inspiration

ACT OF KINDNESS – “I WAS RAISED BY A QUEEN”

One Ontario man’s tiny act of kindness is making a huge impact on social media.

Only in Hamilton

Only in Hamilton

 

Godfrey Cuotto, a 21-year-old student in Hamilton, Ont., was photographed holding hands with a man named Robert with special needs on a local bus earlier this week. The photo, which was later posted on the Facebook page “Only In Hamilton” on Tuesday by a stranger, has now gone viral.

Cuotto says he was coming home from a burrito joint downtown when he entered a packed bus, and a man sitting near the front wanted to shake his hand. A little taken aback at first, the McMaster student says he then shook Robert’s hand.

“He kept holding my hand,” he told the Huffington Post Canada. “I thought I was getting pranked at first, but he just needed comfort.”
Over the 30-minute bus ride, Cuotto says the man held his hand, leaned on him, hugged him and also kissed his hands throughout the ride.

“I just allowed it, like what am I going to do?” Cuotto says. “Sometimes you just have to be selfless and put someone else’s needs above yours.”

Robert’s family member later contacted Cuotto on Facebook and thanked him for comforting their uncle. They also told him Robert suffered from cerebral palsy and was deaf.

On Thursday, Cuotto told Toronto radio station Kiss 92.5 he stayed with Robert until the final stop, and also attributes his kindness to his mom: “I was raised by a queen.”

See story:      http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/10/08/hamilton-man-bus-holding-hands_n_8265558.html

 

LAURA AND HOWARD’S LOVE STORY

Oh my goodness – what a lovely story.  Thank you to their family for sharing such a personal moment of love.

You'll Never Know

Click on the link to see Howard’s serenade You’ll Never Know

Erin Solari, their granddaughter, captured the video: “This video is pretty awesome because she’s almost completely blind and he’s fairly deaf, so it’s difficult for them to communicate,” Solari said. “This kind of thing between them, singing to each other, wasn’t uncommon in our family. They were always singing and dancing and they’d be very vibrant in that way.”

After being told the video had gone viral, Laura remarked:

“I told you Howard that I’d make you famous.”

How lucky they are to have shared over 70 years of love!

now.

Excellent message…now!!! I think it would be a great tattoo….

I didn't have my glasses on....

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10 THINGS TO TEACH YOUR KIDS!

This is such great advice…I’m pretty sure I did an “alright” job at conveying these lessons to my sons – they certainly seem to have got the message; however, in today’s world of parenting where it seems more and more that children are NOT given the chance to fail, to hurt, to be sad, parents may need a refresher course on these crucial teachings.

See the complete article posted by mom.me   here

As parents, we have the responsibility to model resilience for our kids. To teach them to manage disappointment. To show them that not every slight is life-altering—and that a medical diagnosis and not making the varsity team don’t deserve the same emotional response.

Here’s what I want my kids—and yours—to know:

1. Sad happens. If you live and breathe, unhappy things will happen to you and those you love. No amount of education or money or therapy will shield you from disappointment and grief. Prepare for these moments by knowing they will come, but embrace life to the fullest in the in-between spaces.

2. Mitigate regret. When you’re young, regret is a vague concept. But as you get older, it hits you square in the nose. Do your best to honor yourself and others every day so you don’t look back with a whole lot of woulda, shoulda, couldas under your belt. Ask yourself, “How will I look back on this decision? With pride? With embarrassment?” Then, go from there.

3. Guilt is just a feeling. Does guilt have its place? Sure. But when you feel guilty about something, acknowledge it for what it is—an emotion—and do your best to move on. Don’t allow your lives to be stalled or crippled by this Sneaky Pete. And sever ties with anyone who preys on that guilt to control or manipulate you.

4. It’s not always about you. Someone says something unkind? Criticizes you unfairly? More often than not, they’re talking about themselves. Haters feel hated, so they lash out at others. If you take a moment to understand this, you’ll be able to shake it—and them—off more quickly.

5. Not every feeling is worthy of a Petri dish. There will be plenty of opportunities to reflect on your own behaviors or those of others. Do yourself a favor, and don’t get sucked into putting every conversation or interaction under a microscope. You’ll be exhausted by the time you’re 30.

6. Don’t expect perfection. Even the people you love and trust will say and do things that really sting. Learn now that relationships are complex in all of their beauty and pain. If you expect your inner circle will always get it right, you’re setting yourself up for crushing disappointment.

7. Run from drama. We all get caught up in it. It can be mesmerizing but, more often than not, it’s an energy-drain. You have better things to do with your time than getting caught in a web of high emotion with a very low return.

8. Take the blame. If you consistently point the finger at others to account for your unhappiness and mistakes, you’re doomed for doom. Even when fault seems to fall squarely on another’s shoulders, ask yourself, “What part did I play in this? How could I have handled it differently?” Without this ability, you’re signing up for a life of bitterness with a capital B.

9. Choose wisely. Most things in life have a choice component. Staying in a bad relationship? Your choice. Continuing to work for an abusive boss? Same. Exercise your autonomy by recognizing situations in which you’re able to make healthy changes to your benefit.

10. Find your tribe. Surround yourself with like-minded people who respect and like you (and vice-versa). By linking your life to those who challenge and inspire you, you’ll find you have less time for the drama queens and kings, and more time for peace, equilibrium, and goal-setting. Any relationship that brings you down instead of lifting you up messes with your soul. Move on from toxic people as quickly as your legs will carry you.

 

Mother’s Day Tribute

MOTHERS
This is for the mothers who have sat up all night with sick toddlers in their arms, wiping up barf laced with Oscar Mayer wieners and cherry Kool-Aid saying, “It’s okay honey, Mommy’s here.”
Who have sat in rocking chairs for hours on end soothing crying babies who can’t be comforted.
This is for all the mothers who show up at work with spit-up in their hair and milk stains on their blouses and diapers in their purse.
For all the mothers who run carpools and make cookies and sew Halloween costumes. And all the mothers who DON’T.
This is for the mothers who gave birth to babies they’ll never see. And the mothers who took those babies and gave them homes.
This is for the mothers whose priceless art collections are hanging on their refrigerator doors.
And for all the mothers who froze their buns on metal bleachers at football or soccer games instead of watching from the warmth of their cars, so that when their kids asked, “Did you see me, Mom?” they could say, “Of course, I wouldn’t have missed it for the world,” and mean it.
This is for all the mothers who yell at their kids in the grocery store and swat them in despair when they stomp their feet and scream for ice cream before dinner. And for all the mothers who count to ten instead, but realize how child abuse happens.
This is for all the mothers who sat down with their children and explained all about making babies. And for all the (grand) mothers who wanted to, but just couldn’t find the words.
This is for all the mothers who go hungry, so their children can eat. For all the mothers who read “Goodnight, Moon” twice a night for a year. And then read it again. “Just one more time.”
This is for all the mothers who taught their children to tie their shoelaces before they started school. And for all the mothers who opted for Velcro instead.
This is for all the mothers who teach their sons to cook and their daughters to sink a jump shot.
This is for every mother whose head turns automatically when a little voice calls “Mom?” in a crowd, even though they know their own offspring are at home — or even away at college.
This is for all the mothers who sent their kids to school with stomach aches assuring them they’d be just FINE once they got there, only to get calls from the school nurse an hour later asking them to please pick them up. Right away.
This is for mothers whose children have gone astray, who can’t find the words to reach them.
This is for all the step-mothers who raised another woman’s child or children, and gave their time, attention, and love… sometimes totally unappreciated!
For all the mothers who bite their lips until they bleed when their 14-year-olds dye their hair green.
For all the mothers of the victims of recent school shootings, and the mothers of those who did the shooting. For the mothers of the survivors, and the mothers who sat in front of their TVs in horror, hugging their child who just came home from school, safely.
This is for all the mothers who taught their children to be peaceful, and now pray they come home safely from a war.
What makes a good Mother anyway? Is it patience? Compassion? Broad hips? The ability to nurse a baby, cook dinner, and sew a button on a shirt, all at the same time? Or is it in her heart? Is it the ache you feel when you watch your son or daughter disappear down the street, walking to school alone for the very first time?
The jolt that takes you from sleep to dread, from bed to crib at 2 A.M. to put your hand on the back of a sleeping baby? The panic, years later, that comes again at 2 A.M. when you just want to hear their key in the door and know they are safe again in your home? Or the need to flee from wherever you are and hug your child when you hear news of a fire, a car accident, a child dying?
The emotions of motherhood are universal and so our thoughts are for young mothers stumbling through diaper changes and sleep deprivation…And mature mothers learning to let go.
For working mothers and stay-at-home mothers. Single mothers and married mothers. Mothers with money, mothers without.
This is for you all. For all of us. Hang in there. In the end we can only do the best we can. Tell them every day that we love them. And pray. “Home is what catches you when you fall – and we all fall.”

MAN’S BEST FRIEND

 Dogs are Welcome!
A man wrote a letter to a small hotel in a Midwest town he planned to visit on his vacation. He wrote: I would very much like to bring my dog with me. He is well groomed and very well behaved.
Would you be willing to permit me to keep him in my room with me at night?”

SIR: “I’ve been operating this hotel for many years. In all that time, I’ve never had a dog steal towels, bed clothes, silverware, pictures off the walls, or use them as a coloring book. I’ve never had to evict a dog in the middle of the night for being drunk and disorderly. And I’ve never had a dog run out on a hotel bill. Yes, indeed, your dog is welcome at my hotel. And, if your dog will vouch for you, you’re welcome to stay here, too.” !
Truly man’s best friend

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Man's Best Friend

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